Window Treatment Ideas & How-Tos

A woman covering her ears with her hands.
When was the last time you enjoyed a good night’s sleep? It hardly helps that they expanded the road by your home, transforming a once-quiet strip into the Winternationals. And then there’s that kid racing by on his unmuffled motorcycle. Several times. Late at night. Fear not; we’ve got you...
A bay window in a living room with flowers and a book.
Bay windows are architectural gems that open a room to the outdoors. Like any gem, they need a great setting to truly shine. Many standard window treatments don’t do bay windows justice. They can’t fit the angles and curves of these convex creations, or they block too much natural light....
A row of colorful curtains on a wall.
It’s no secret that colors affect our mood, and that yellow can stimulate feelings of happiness and hunger. Look no further than myriad fast food logos across the USA. Reds and yellows dominate. Chow down, America. How does all this relate to window treatments? Choosing the right color for your...
A sun room with hardwood floors and a window.
Many homeowners use sunrooms for entertaining guests. Their open atmosphere makes them a natural gathering place. That said, too much bright sun is a problem, even in a room designed for it. Plus, you may not enjoy the fishbowl effect of windows on three sides, presenting your neighbors with a...
A black curtain rod with beige curtains hanging on it.
A layered window treatment combines different types of window coverings on the same window to achieve a unique look and utility. It’s all about doubling up — think of it as accessorizing your windows. For instance, you could pair a light-filtering sheer curtain with a heavier, blackout drape to enjoy...
A kitchen with blue cabinets and wooden stools.
On today’s menu are new window treatments to replace the drab curtains in your kitchen. Kitchens come with window treatment baggage. They’re hot, high-humidity areas where grease can also be a problem. Any covering should be easy to clean and moisture-resistant, but that doesn’t mean you have to compromise on...
A child's room with a crib and a teddy bear.
Few things are more exciting than bringing a new baby into your home. New blinds are exciting, too, and there’s no reason you can’t have both. Not all window treatments work well in a nursery. Corded blinds aren’t the best choice for the room you’re busy decorating with kiddie decals....
A white living room with wooden floors and white furniture.
We know what you’re thinking: “Curtains are so yesterday.” Admittedly, off-the-shelf curtains can be dull and downright unsatisfying. But in the hands of a skilled designer, curtains can transform a room into a stylish and surprisingly modern space. So don’t write off curtains just yet — our guide will take...
A wooden bench with pillows and a book in front of a window.
In this blog, we’ll discuss window treatments that were popular in the past and still work well today. Did you know that the ancient Greeks and Romans used wooden shutters? Or that the first patent for Venetian blinds was filed in 1769? Our window treatment forefathers clearly understood a thing...
A shattered glass window in a building.

Laminated windows have two or more layers of glass bonded with a durable interlayer, typically made of polyvinyl butyral (PVB) or ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) resin.

This construction creates a sandwich-like structure that makes laminated windows significantly stronger and more secure than standard single-pane windows.

A woman sitting at a desk with a cat looking out the window.
Congrats! You landed that remote work position you’ve been bucking for all these years. No more traffic snarls or 90-minute commutes to the office, where you’ll be chained to a cubicle until it’s time to catch the 5:30 traffic jam home. You’re a free person! Now you can pretend to...
A living room with white shutters and a coffee table.
Window shutters date back thousands of years. Shutters protected the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans from the elements, regulated light and airflow, and provided privacy and security. Mediterranean cultures greatly influenced their design and use. The traditional shutters of Italy, Spain, and France have fixed louvers angled to let in...